conferences

APCOM 2019 mini-symposium

Jinhyun Choo co-organizes a mini-symposium entitled "Computational Geomechanics, Poromechanics, and Granular Mechanics" at APCOM 2019, which will be held in Taipei, Taiwan, on December 18–21, 2019. Abstract submission is now open until May 15, 2019. The mini-symposium description is given below. We hope to have you there!

MS 1701: Computational Geomechanics, Poromechanics, and Granular Mechanics

Organizers

Jinhyun Choo, The University of Hong Kong
Jidong Zhao, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

Description

Geomaterials such as soils and rocks are porous granular materials that behave very differently from other materials in science and engineering. Computational modeling of these geomaterials plays vital roles in many problems related to civil infrastructure, energy, and the environment. This mini-symposium is intended to provide a forum for presentation and discussion of recent advances in the fundamentals and applications of geomechanics, poromechanics, and granular mechanics. Contributions are solicited in, but not restricted to, the following topic areas: (1) development, implementation, and validation of constitutive models for geomaterials, (2) computational methods and algorithms for coupled poromechanics and other multi-physics problems, (3) granular mechanics and other micromechanics approaches to geomaterials, (4) multiscale modeling techniques, (5) meshfree methods for large deformation problems, (6) numerical modeling of fracture and damage processes, and (7) uncertainty quantification and probabilistic methods.

EMI 2019 Computational Geomechanics mini-symposium

Jinhyun Choo co-organizes a mini-symposium entitled "Computational Geomechanics" at EMI 2019, which will be held at Caltech on June 18–21, 2019. This will be a joint conference with the ASCE Geo-Institute. Abstract submission is now open until January 30, 2019. The mini-symposium description is given below. We hope to have you there!

MS35: Computational Geomechanics

Organizers

Jinhyun Choo, The University of Hong Kong (Contact Organizer)
Jose Andrade, California Institute of Technology
Ronaldo Borja, Stanford University
Qiushi Chen, Clemson University
Majid Manzari, George Washington University
SeonHong Na, McMaster University
Richard Regueiro, University of Colorado Boulder
WaiChing Sun, Columbia University

Description

This mini-symposium will provide a forum for presentation and discussion of the state-of-the-art in computational geomechanics. Emphasis will be on novel formulations, computational methods, and numerical simulations involving geomaterials such as soil and rock. Contributions are solicited in, but not restricted to, the following topic areas in computational geomechanics: (1) development, implementation, and validation of advanced constitutive models, (2) computational models and algorithms for multiphysics problems (coupled multiphase flow and solid deformation, chemo-thermo-hydro-mechanics, etc.), (3) numerical modeling of fracture, damage, and fragmentation processes in geomaterials, (4) micromechanics (particulate mechanics, molecular dynamics, etc.), (5) multiscale modeling (hierarchical and concurrent schemes, etc.), (6) meshfree methods for large deformation problems, (7) nonlocal and/or generalized continuum modeling, (8) dynamics of geomaterials, and (9) uncertainty quantification and probabilistic methods.

EMI 2018 & Computational Mechanics Committee

Jinhyun Choo has attended the EMI 2018 Conference and delivered a talk entitled "Coupling phase-field and plasticity for unified modeling of brittle and ductile failures in geomaterials." He also co-chaired the Computational Geomechanics mini-symposium, which hosted a number of high-quality presentations. 

During the conference, Jinhyun has also been elected to be a member of the Computational Mechanics Committee. The purpose of the EMI Computational Mechanics Committee is to foster the development and applications of the methods of computational methods (finite element, boundary element, finite difference, finite volume, and others) to problems of engineering mechanics, including structural mechanics, solid mechanics, geomechanics, fluid mechanics, fluid–structure interaction, as well as dynamic and thermal effects.

EMI 2018 Computational Geomechanics mini-symposium

Jinhyun Choo co-organizes a mini-symposium entitled "Computational Geomechanics" in EMI 2018, which will be held at MIT on May 29–June 1, 2018. Abstract submission is now open until January 31, 2018. The mini-symposium description is given below. We hope to have you there!

MS27: Computational Geomechanics

Organizers

WaiChing Sun, Columbia University
Jose Andrade, California Institute of Technology
Ronaldo Borja, Stanford University
Jinhyun Choo, University of Hong Kong
Majid Manzari, George Washington University
Richard Regueiro, University of Colorado Boulder

Description

Geomaterials, such as soil, rock, and concrete, are multiphase porous materials whose macroscopic mechanical behaviors are governed by grain size distribution and mineralogy, fluid-saturation, pore space, temperature, loading paths and rate, drainage conditions, chemical reactions, and other factors. As a result, predicting the mechanical responses of geomaterials often require knowledge of how several processes, which often take place in different spatial and temporal domains, interact with each other across length scales. This mini-symposium is intended to provide a forum for researchers to present contributions to recent advances in computational geomechanics problems. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to (1) development and validation of constitutive models that addressed multi-physical coupling effects, (2) discrete and continuum formulations for geomechanics problems, (3) iterative sequential couplings of fluid and solid solvers, (4) uncertainty quantification and spatial variability of soil properties, (5) multiscale mechanics, (6) modeling of weak and strong discontinuities, (7) regularization techniques to circumvent pathological mesh dependence and (8) techniques to model crack growth and fragmentation processes in geomaterials.